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Caruso’s musical ‘Nice’ list sure can swing BY JIM CARUSO  (jim-caruso.com)  |  I  love spending the holidays in New York City — but between the over-blown seasonal spectaculars, the inclement weather and throngs of gaping tourists, a Manhattan Christmas can sometimes be overwhelming. In concocting this list of December must-sees, I’ve noticed that my choices are […]

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BY SCOTT STIFFLER  |  Currently living in Manila, Filipino photographer Niccolo Cosme says that although his city was spared from the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan, “We started to feel its impact day by day. We have never seen anything of this magnitude, where communities, towns and provinces were washed out. We found ourselves in volunteer […]

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A Downtown arts era ended Nov. 23, when the Clocktower Gallery at 108 Leonard St. closed after more than 40 years of continuous installations. Since its founding in 1972 by Alanna Heiss, who also started the P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center (now MoMA P.S. 1), the gallery was a home for transgressive and avant garde […]

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Renzo Ortega, below, and Chris Charbonneau were among 150 Hunter College art students who welcomed visitors into their new Tribeca studios on Nov. 25. The second, third and fourth floors of the 205 Hudson St. building are now home to the college’s M.F.A. Studio Art program, and are lined with small-but-inspired spaces in which students […]

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PHOTO EXHIBIT: HISTORIC FIREHOUSES OF MANHATTAN What does it say about a man who spends his entire career on call to run towards danger, only to occupy his “golden years” by preserving buildings in a manner that flames can’t touch? New York’s Bravest never punch the clock, apparently. They just find a new outlet for […]

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  BY TOM TENNEY  |  In 1961, Ellen Stewart revolutionized the New York performance scene when she opened Café La MaMa in the basement of an East Ninth Street tenement. The African-American fashion designer-cum-impresario imagined the new space as an alternative to popular Off-Off Broadway venues like Caffe Cino and the Gaslight — small spaces that […]

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BY OPHIRA EISENBERG  |  Ten years ago when my friend told me that I should listen to his podcast, I have to admit I was pretty skeptical about the entire medium. I remember saying, “So let me get this straight — you plugged a microphone into your computer and talked about what was on your […]

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BY MARTIN DENTON (of indietheaternow.com) | I remember vividly the moment I knew Kevin Augustine was a genius. It was a sultry August afternoon in 1999. I was sitting in the audience in the now-defunct Collective Unconscious space on Ludlow Street in the Lower East Side, partaking of yet another show in the third annual […]

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Raised on South Dakota’s Rosebud Reservation, 24-year-old Chicago-based performer/producer Frank Waln grew up immersed in the surprisingly complimentary worlds Native American, electronica and hip-hop music. The resulting performance style is a deft mix of traditional beats, dense rapping and looping mixes used to address the negative portrayal of Native Americans and overcome “the self-oppression that […]

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BY SCOTT STIFFLER  |  HUDSON PARK LIBRARY’S ERROL FLYNN BLAST He wasn’t all swashbuckling and Sherwood Forest. Although his icon status comes from physically demanding roles in popcorn pleasers like 1940’s “The Sea Hawk” and 1938’s “The Adventures of Robin Hood,” the final phase of Hudson Park Library’s “Errol Flynn Blast” plunges the moral high […]

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