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  BY TOM TENNEY  |  In 1961, Ellen Stewart revolutionized the New York performance scene when she opened Café La MaMa in the basement of an East Ninth Street tenement. The African-American fashion designer-cum-impresario imagined the new space as an alternative to popular Off-Off Broadway venues like Caffe Cino and the Gaslight — small spaces that […]

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BY OPHIRA EISENBERG  |  Ten years ago when my friend told me that I should listen to his podcast, I have to admit I was pretty skeptical about the entire medium. I remember saying, “So let me get this straight — you plugged a microphone into your computer and talked about what was on your […]

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BY MARTIN DENTON (of indietheaternow.com) | I remember vividly the moment I knew Kevin Augustine was a genius. It was a sultry August afternoon in 1999. I was sitting in the audience in the now-defunct Collective Unconscious space on Ludlow Street in the Lower East Side, partaking of yet another show in the third annual […]

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Raised on South Dakota’s Rosebud Reservation, 24-year-old Chicago-based performer/producer Frank Waln grew up immersed in the surprisingly complimentary worlds Native American, electronica and hip-hop music. The resulting performance style is a deft mix of traditional beats, dense rapping and looping mixes used to address the negative portrayal of Native Americans and overcome “the self-oppression that […]

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BY SCOTT STIFFLER  |  HUDSON PARK LIBRARY’S ERROL FLYNN BLAST He wasn’t all swashbuckling and Sherwood Forest. Although his icon status comes from physically demanding roles in popcorn pleasers like 1940’s “The Sea Hawk” and 1938’s “The Adventures of Robin Hood,” the final phase of Hudson Park Library’s “Errol Flynn Blast” plunges the moral high […]

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BY TRAV S.D. (travsd.wordpress.com)   |   What a pleasant surprise! I went to the current revival of Tennessee Williams’ 1965 “The Mutilated” to watch two heavyweights slug it out and received that spectacle in spades, plus a good deal more. Mink Stole and Penny Arcade are both larger-than-life as Williams’ sordidly symbiotic odd couple, Trinket and Celeste, […]

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BY SCOTT STIFFLER  | Someone once said,” observes artist Richard Baumann, “that landscape painting is all about loss and memory.” A project that began in 1993, it took only two decades for many of the West Village and Lower Manhattan shops depicted in Baumann’s oil paintings to go from neighborhood anchors to relics of a bygone […]

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BY TRAV S.D.  (travsd.wordpress.com)  |  If you’re at all like me, this Halloween season you’ll be asking the question: What are the best ape-related classic studio era horror films for me to watch, not including “King Kong” or its sequels “Son of Kong” and “Mighty Joe Young” — which are GIANT ape movies, a different species of horror film altogether? […]

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BY WICKHAM BOYLE | The most unyippified street in the currently very ungritty Tribeca, is Staple St. A scant three-block North-South street running between buildings with barely enough room for a massive modern SUV to squeeze through, and demarcated by a covered pedestrian bridge formerly used as a connector between hospital buildings in days gone […]

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This group show chronicles the emergence and development of black performance art over three generations. To fully shed light on the rich and complex history of this subject, it surveys the scene from the 1960s to the present. Benjamin Patterson, David Hammons, Senga Nengudi and Coco Fusco are among the artists featured. In addition, a […]

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