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BY SCOTT STIFFLER  |  Choosing what you’re going to see at the Tribeca Film Festival on its opening date, April 16, is like waiting the day before to file your taxes. It’s possible, but not practical — and a very good way to end up waiting in line. Full house potentials, broken down by genre […]

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BY SEAN EGAN  |  American audiences are conditioned to expect maximum levels of raucous debauchery from their bachelor party flicks — but “The Bachelor Weekend” provides viewers with a slightly different, more gentle spin on the genre. Released as “The Stag” overseas, this Irish import to the Tribeca Film Festival is a breezy, genial film […]

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BY RANIA RICHARDSON  |  Spiritual devotion ripens into carnal passion for a young temple dancer in “Vara: A Blessing.” The modern-day tale is a glimpse into the practices of an intriguing Hindu subculture of devadasis. As a practitioner, Lila (Shahana Goswami) spends her days worshiping Krishna and studying the classical dance form, Bharatanatyam, in her […]

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BY SAM SPOKONY  |  Stories about abductions which purposely blur the lines of fact and fiction are certainly nothing new — and in fact it was 16th-century tales of Englishmen falling into the hands of Barbary pirates, and then 17th-century recounting of New England colonists taken by Native Americans, that laid the ground for the […]

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BY MICHAEL LYDON  |  On a grey and snowy Tuesday morning in the East Village, a trickle of senior citizens, bundled up in puffy winter coats, hats pulled over their ears, scarves wrapped around their necks and instrument cases large and small in their gloved hands, made their way to the Third Street Music School […]

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DAVID ROW: THERE AND BACK Row’s first New York solo show in years features stunning shaped canvases and related works on paper. While their unusual polygonal form is new for the artist, the compositions still reflect his signature abstract vocabulary. For decades, Row has employed heavily worked layers of lush oil paint to gradually form […]

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BY NORMAN BORDEN  |  Matthew Pillsbury is a photographer with a unique vision of contemporary metropolitan life. For the last decade or so, he’s been taking long exposure, large format (8×10 inch film) black and white photographs that compel viewers to slow down and smell the roses, so to speak — or at least take […]

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BY SCOTT STIFFLER |  From Chicago, Toronto and other chilly climes they come — to perform daring acts of indie theater and mock a weary Manhattan’s notion of what passes for excessive snowfall. Over the next three weeks, as the predictions of a certain Staten-Island based groundhog will likely continue to prove annoyingly accurate, the […]

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BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN  |  stephaniebuhmann.com  |  PANCHO WESTENDARP: THINGS THAT BARELY EXIST  |  Westendarp’s drawings, videos and installations seek to analyze relationships between time, space, memory and movement. He states, “Developing our own way of measuring time means creating our own notion of history and developing new rituals where time can be practical and playful.” Through March 9, at Robert Henry […]

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BY MICHAEL LYDON  michaelydon.com  |  The first wave of 1960s Greenwich Village folk music was all acoustic: unamplified flattop guitars, banjos, dulcimers, harmonicas and the occasional standup bass. The groups were small — many solos and duos, a scattering of trios and a few rare quartets. Drums? Never! Most of the folkies were college-age white […]

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