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BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN | Pace Gallery’s second solo exhibition of Lee Ufan follows his 2011 survey at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Born in 1936 in Korea, Ufan is a pioneering figure of both Japan’s Mono-ha (“School of Things”) movement of the 1960s and the Tansaekhwa school of Korean monochrome painting. He is best known for compositions […]

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RUBIN MUSEUM OF ART BLOCK PARTY Culture, contemplation, physical fitness and…ice cream? It’s a perfectly logical combination, at least for one afternoon — when our favorite museum takes their celebration of Himalayan art and ideas off the wall and into the street. Using the Rubin’s “Becoming Another: The Power of Masks” exhibition as inspiration, this […]

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BY PUMA PERL | “No cover…yes grooviness,” declared a flier created by Moon Goddess, one of the bands that opened the current season of Joff Wilson’s ”Music Under the Stars” — a fitting description of this monthly event at the 6th & B Garden, curated and hosted by a decidedly groovy guy. Good vibes all […]

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BY NORMAN BORDEN | Paolo Pellizzari is a Belgium-based photographer who has added a unique perspective to the art of sports photography — a panoramic, 135-degree wide view of iconic sporting events like the Tour De France and the Olympics. Until I saw this thoroughly engaging exhibition at Anastasia Photo, my idea of a memorable […]

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BY SEAN EGAN | Make your way through Tompkins Square Park and you’ll see something new near the Hare Krishna tree — a small, unassuming wooden booth sitting amongst a light layer of straw. Inside this booth is a single, teal-colored typewriter, loaded with a long spool of paper and attached to an iPad (which […]

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THE WASHINGTON SQUARE MUSIC FESTIVAL What our city lacks in a crystal clear view of every star in the sky, it more than makes up for in the sensory stimulation offered by the Washington Square Music Festival. The free, eclectic, daylight-to-dusk-to-dark outdoor series — which has already given us two Lutz Rath-conducted Festival Chamber Orchestra […]

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BY JIM MELLOAN | Johnny Rivers’ career was in high gear 50 years ago. On the July 3, 1965 Billboard Hot 100, his “Seventh Son” hit No. 7 — which was, fittingly, its peak (and where it remained for three weeks). He had hit it big the previous year with his versions of Chuck Berry’s “Memphis” […]

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BY CHARLES BATTERSBY | In decades past, geek media like comic books and video games would avoid direct mention of LGBT themes. This was because geek media was often seen as childish, while LGBT representation was viewed as inherently sexual and unsuitable for kids. In recent years, a new generation of gay and transgender creators […]

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BY WINNIE McCROY | For LGBT youth who come from across the boroughs and New Jersey to hang out in the West Village, this historically gay neighborhood is a place where they are able to be out and proud. For some, it is the only place where they can truly be themselves — but in […]

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BY SCOTT STIFFLER | Known the world over for their sophistication, it comes as no shock to New York City audiences that our vibrant Broadway community has its share of those who identify as something other than strictly heterosexual. This may seem like a recent trend — but scholars believe it can be traced all […]

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