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BY MAX BURBANK | My, but it’s been a busy week! So much has happened! As Trump himself eloquently put it, “This is going to lead to more and more and more.” It’s difficult to pick a place to start and end up at the point I want to make. Bear with me. I’m gonna skip […]

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BY JIM MELLOAN | Fifty years and a couple of months ago, Sly & the Family Stone’s “Dance to the Music” peaked at No. 8 on the Billboard Hot 100. And so, in March and April, I was playing that one on my “50 Years Ago This Week” radio show. I had dinner with my […]

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BY TRAV S.D. | It’s Pride Month! We take the opportunity to recall that “LGBT” often comes with a “Q” appended to it. Queerness being by definition a wild card, we take the liberty of exploring a related, if tangential, phenomenon: drag performance in classic comedy. Back in the day, nearly every comedian, major and […]

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BY MARK NIMAR | On stage, in film, and on television, an Asian character is more likely to be practicing medicine or working with technology than scoring a three-pointer or dribbling a basketball down a court. This narrow mainstream portrayal, however, is not what Chinese American playwright Lauren Yee experienced during her formative years in […]

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BY SCOTT STIFFLER | Intense, exhilarating, somber, hellish, heartbreaking, ultimately uplifting — and laugh-out-loud funny throughout its two-part, nearly eight-hour running time — the acclaimed London production of Tony Kushner’s Pulitzer-winning 1993 play “Angels in America” has arrived in its titular country with the dynamic ensemble largely intact (including Andrew Garfield as AIDS patient and […]

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BY DUSICA SUE MALESEVIC | German composer Johann Sebastian Bach was not afraid to take on one of the most controversial beverages of the 1700s: coffee. Indeed, the master addressed the stimulant in one of his secular works known as the “Coffee Cantata,” in which a father beseeches his daughter to forsake the caffeinated drink. […]

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BY SCOTT STIFFLER | Scotto Mycklebust is always coming up with new ways to roll with the punches and raise the profile of those who share his creative calling — and his zip code. In 2010, when a hot new destination known as the High Line was about to change the face (and the foot traffic) […]

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BY TRAV S.D. | The tragic events of September 11, 2001 brought about thousands of negative repercussions. Lives were lost and torn apart. Whole communities were devastated. Wars were fought. A rare positive effect, however, was that The Flea Theater, one of the closest performing arts venues to the World Trade Center, geographically went from […]

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BY TRAV S.D. | Seven and a half years. That’s how long Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) thought people would still be interested in reading his writing after he died. Chekhov never dreamt that 114 years after he passed, millions would still be savoring his work. As a case in point, his play “Uncle Vanya” has been […]

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BY JIM MELLOAN | It was sometime in 1966 when Hugo Montenegro went into an RCA studio with some session musicians on a Saturday to do a cover of the theme from “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” Italian director Sergio Leone’s third installment of his “Dollars Trilogy” of spaghetti westerns. All three of […]

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