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BY DUSICA SUE MALESEVIC | Alvin Ailey’s “Revelations,” 57 years on, is, well, still a revelation. Performed as part of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater’s 2017 season at New York City Center, the piece — created when the choreographer was just 29 — feels as fresh and as relevant as ever, and certainly got […]

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BY REBECCA FIORE | Rick Carrier received his first 35mm film camera as a result of World War II. To document combat situations, soldiers at the time were issued a Cineflex PH-330 — a direct copy of the German Arriflex 35 II model. Before being shipped out overseas, Carrier shot home movies of his sisters, […]

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BY TRAV S.D. | In a time when the US and the UK seem to share all manner of pop stars, hit musicals, movies, TV shows, comedians and best-selling authors, it may be a surprise to learn that there has been at least one uncrackable nut when it comes to the transatlantic cross-fertilization of cultural […]

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BY MAX BURBANK | (Lights up on SANTA and JESUS seated at dilapidated bar that last saw renovations in 1978. They are both smoking like chimneys. Several empty glasses and bottles indicate they have been there awhile. An elderly bartender gives them the fish-eye while towel-drying a single tumbler far longer than any tumbler needs […]

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THE PENN SOUTH CERAMICS STUIDO HOLIDAY SALE | In our modern if somewhat impersonal world of prepaid gift cards, nothing says you truly care quite like a present that’s been made by hand. But what if your clumsy lobster claws aren’t even remotely capable of creating something that special person on your “Nice” list will actually […]

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BY CHARLES BATTERSBY | New York has a major Comic Con but, in years past, there was a con just for Japanese comics and cartoons. The old New York Anime Festival was absorbed into the New York Comic Con (NYCC) five years ago, leaving the city’s nerdy Japanophiles without a major con they could claim […]

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BY TRAV S.D. | How soon is “too soon” — are 2,000 years enough? Probably not when you’re talking about the mass suicide at Masada (73 CE) or the Jewish Holocaust during the Third Reich. Yet in “Diaspora” (playing at The Gym at Judson through Dec. 23), playwright Nathaniel Sam Shapiro tackles both of these […]

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BY MAX BURBANK | Here’s a kind of interesting thought I think you’ll enjoy: In preparing to write a column on Donald Trump’s first year in office (well, since his election), I was reminded of that time back in 2004 when the History News Network surveyed 415 prominent historians asking who the worst president in […]

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“YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN” | The run of their show is only four days, but this one’s going to be EPIC — as in, another ambitious project from the EPIC Players Inclusion Company. Back in July, when we last heard from the neuro-inclusive troupe (comprised of artists and technicians both with and without developmental […]

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BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN | Showcasing the beauty of common objects, textiles, housewares and furniture, NYU’s Grey Art Gallery explores the hugely influential collaboration between Alfred H. Barr Jr., MoMA’s first director, and Philip Johnson, its first curator of architecture. By orchestrating a series of pioneering exhibitions at the museum in the 1930s and 40s, both men had been responsible […]

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