Pen Parentis turns 14, turns to crime

Posman Books will be on site this season, to sell the work of featured authors. Photo courtesy Pen Parentis.

Posman Books will be on site this season, to sell the work of featured authors. Photos courtesy Pen Parentis.

BY SCOTT STIFFLER | Today’s youth could pick up a few tips about personal growth and social grace in the teen years by attending a Pen Parentis Literary Salon. Too bad they’re ineligible for this 21+ event, where you can mingle with authors equally dedicated to their biological and creative progeny.

The launch of season 14 finds the Salon entering a new partnership with Posman Books, whose third location just opened at Brookfield Place. “You’ll see their bright green storefront on the second floor in that section of lovely new boutiques that used to be the food court,” says longtime Downtowner and Parentis founder M. M. De Voe, adding, “Pen Parentis loves indie booksellers and we’re delighted that such a friendly, and well-curated neighborhood shop will be vending books for signings at our salons.”

Posman Books will be on site this season, to sell the work of featured authors. Photo courtesy Pen Parentis.

Orli Van Mourik will accept her award at the Sept. 8 event.

That generous quote is par for the course for Pen Parentis, a tireless nonprofit champion of strategies and resources for authors like Orli Van Mourik. New to Brooklyn by way of Portland, Oregon, the mother of two young daughters will read from “Waushakum Pond” — which won her a $1,000 Pen Parentis Writing Fellowship for New Parents award.

With the kids safe at home and set to call it an early night (public schools start the next morning), Sept. 8’s event has trouble in mind.

The three panelists, who immerse themselves in the gritty realm of crime fiction when they’re not tending to the juice box set or contemplating the appeal of tween music choices, will begin the night by reading from their work.

In lock step with the Pen Parentis dedication to multitasking, Tim O’Mara’s “Raymond Donne Mysteries” series has the former Brooklyn cop working as a schoolteacher, and still finding time to solve murders.

Ed Lin began his Robert Chow series with the “This Is a Bust,” set in 1970s Chinatown.

Ed Lin began his Robert Chow series with “This Is a Bust,” set in 1970s Chinatown.

Ed Lin, the first author to win three Asian American Literary Awards, might get to the gig by trekking through the home turf of his 1970s Chinatown cop character Robert Chow, whose series started with 2007’s “This Is a Bust.” Also on the panel is Boston area short fiction and poetry writer Jack Miller, whose connection to the crime theme we’ll leave as a mystery to be unearthed by the audience.

Tues. Sept. 8, 7 p.m. at the Andaz Wall Street (75 Wall St. Enter on Water or Pearl Sts.). This 21+ event, with wine and light snacks provided by the host venue, is free (RSVP via penparentis.org is recommended).

Pen Parentis Literary Salons are held on the second Tues. of each month, through May. October’s theme is “Literary Horror,” with John Langan, Sarah Langan and Veronica Shanoes.

 

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One Response to Pen Parentis turns 14, turns to crime

  1. Thanks for creating awareness.. once again I thank you for the post..

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